Wave Breathing – A Type of Pranayama For Lowering Blood Pressure and Stress

Wave Breathing – A Type of Pranayama For Lowering Blood Pressure and Stress

Pranayama

Pranama or breath control is a very powerful tool not only in yoga but also anywhere and at anytime to keep blood pressure and stress at a minimum. prana means “life force.” The ancient sages realized that a person couldn’t live for very long without breathing and there was a direct connection between breathing and living. Smart people those sages. Pranayama is definitely an art as well as a science. Many people breathe incorrectly by forcing air into the upper lobes of their lungs leaving the bottom half of their lungs inactive. Watch a person breathe, while they are unaware of your watching them, and you will probably see their chest move rather than their stomach. This is indicative of wrongful breathing. The diaphragm, the sheet of muscle between the thorax and the abdomen, is the organ of breath. When it moves downward air flows into the lungs and when it relaxes back to its original dome-shaped position air flows out of the lungs.

This is normal, natural and unconscious breathing. But with the advent of chairs for sitting and tight belts for holding up pants, breathing has become reversed and lungs have become underutilized.

Wave Breathing

Wave breathing is a type of pranayama that I have learned to use over the years that is very effective in lowering my blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing rate. It is also very relaxing and soothing to my mind. Wave breathing is best done while standing, sitting or lying down. It can also be done while walking and doing mild yoga, but it is very difficult to do while vigorously exercising.

To do wave breathing, breathe in through the nose focusing on the diaphragm, pulling air into the bottom of the lungs.

I like to imagine the lungs as one large flat bag (much like a water bottle) extending all the way from the pelvis to the neck. Inflate the lungs slowly from the bottom, bringing air toward the top and imagine the air moving like an ocean wave. Don’t inflate the lungs fully but only partially, maybe about one-third full and then relax and let the lungs slowly deflate from the bottom to the top again. Breathing is done slowly and deliberately with emphasis on wave motion from bottom to top both on inhalation and exhalation. One hundred percent of the lungs’ volume is utilized this way with very little effort. With practice you will begin to notice your breathing rate become slower. You may be taking only two or three breaths per minute and feeling no discomfort at all. Also, the amount of air that you are taking in with each breath will get less and less, almost to the point of having the feeling of not breathing. The first time this happened to me I thought I wasn’t breathing at all. This is a very healthy practice because it calms everything while bathing every cell in the body with rich, fresh oxygen.

I didn’t read about wave breathing and no one taught me how do it. I discovered the method accidently one day while in the resting pose after doing some yoga. Since then, I have practiced wave breathing in different positions and in various situations. It always brings me into a state of calmness and peace of mind. Sometimes I like to practice wave breathing while listening to music. This morning I put on a CD consisting of a mixture of Benedictine Monk songs. I traveled though the poses very slowly and held the poses longer than usual while wave breathing. It was another unusual but marvelous experience. Focusing on my breath moving up and down my lungs like an ocean wave, I could literally feel the music being absorbed into my body The experience brought a complete sense of oneness with the breath, the body, and the music. I believe wave breathing could be another way to calm the mind for the purpose of reaching the state of consciousness known as pure awareness.

Neil Crenshaw, Ph.D.
http://www.pureawareness.info


High Blood Pressure Facts Doctors Don’t Mention

High Blood Pressure Facts Doctors Don’t Mention

Article by Nigel Le Monnier

High Blood Pressure Facts Doctors Don’t Mention – Health – Diseases and Conditions

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While in the doctor’s office, you expect to hear all the details relating to your high blood pressure. Yet, oftentimes this is not the case. The lack of discussion or full disclosure on the part of your doctor is related to two main factors 1) the complex nature of the underlying problem and 2) efforts to minimise and alleviate your concerns. Instead, your physician may focus on the medical procedures and management aimed at reducing the symptoms.

There are 3 hypertensive circumstances your doctor may find unnecessary to discuss with you:

1: Immediate Treatment for Hypertension
In order to diagnose a patient with high blood pressure a physician usually determines the patient’s baseline number. This approach rules out any complementary or influencing factors that can temporarily elevate the blood pressure and establishes a basis for comparison.

Blood pressure in assessed as normal at: 120/80 mm Hg (millimetre of mercury). Any extreme variation to this model is often treated aggressively by physicians. Therefore, a sustained elevated reading above 140/90 mmHg is sound reason to diagnose a patient as hypertensive and a follow-up treatment plan implemented.

Deviations, however, occur in several instances for one or more reasons:
• A patient’s blood pressure has reached the upper end of stage 1 (159/99 mm Hg) or is at stage 2 (>160/>100 mm Hg).
• The decision to err on the side of caution. Any noteworthy value above normal levels is cause for immediate medical attention. This is done particularly if the patient has one or more risk factors.
• Obesity and diabetes harbour strong risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Patients with these conditions are usually treated immediately with blood pressure lowering medications

2: Controlling Your Blood Pressure Naturally
High blood pressure can often be controlled through diet and exercise. Unless a patient has non-modifiable risk factors such as age, family history, gender, and cultural factors, then medications are considered to reduce complications.

A healthy lifestyle change in which 75% of foods eaten are plant based, along with regular exercise and calming meditations can positively impact a person’s cardiovascular health.

3: Subtle Warning Signs in Women
Although tests for women are accomplished the same way as those for men, women are still extremely vulnerable to cardiovascular diseases. In fact, studies show that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States and often one of the most preventable. Because a woman’s response to a myocardial infarction (heart attack) differs from men, often this difference results in a high degree of misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment for women.

A doctor’s appreciation of this fact is much greater now with research. Additionally, the role of heart associations and charities across the globe, have been impactful in raising awareness of women’s health issues. Still, in a clinical setting women’s health is insufficiently managed.

These outlines examine the primary instances where high blood pressure facts are not mentioned to the patient. Despite these circumstances doctor’s primary objective is to diagnose, treat diseases and reduce risk factors, and as such a large learning curve is still to be overcome.

About the Author

Nigel Le Monnier has over 20 years-experience as a qualified natural health professional in the UK. He is now writing articles for a website solely devoted to bringing a comprehensive range of natural health advice to everyone. To find out more about natural remedies for blood pressure visit his website at Natural Health 4 Life.

Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

Nigel Le Monnier



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Nigel Le Monnier has over 20 years-experience as a qualified natural health professional in the UK. He is now writing articles for a website solely devoted to bringing a comprehensive range of natural health advice to everyone. To find out more about natural remedies for blood pressure visit his website at Natural Health 4 Life.












Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines

whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.